Posts

Architectural Photography – Now’s the time

Photo by Michael LoBiondo Photography

Architectural Photography

We are doing a lot of Architectural Photography now and put together this little piece.  We’re always looking for an interesting angle to photograph when interpreting the architect’s design.  Also, shooting at dusk gives us a unique perspective on the building,the lighting and space around it.

It’s also great to photograph the architects, developers or designers.  We also photograph the real workmen/women on the job but that’s for another blog post.

ML

“…look at what the shadow does…”

coil-metal-plans-hardhat

Photography by Michael LoBiondo specializing in people, corporate,industrial, and advertising.

Sometimes, the light just works for ya’!!  This is from an Annual Report shoot we did on an industrial location.  We shot a bunch of stuff with “regulation” eye wear so you could see the model and see where they’re eyes were looking.  There wasn’t any shadows on the papers and you could see all of his face.  After we got the shot the client liked in the can, I started to move him around so that the shadow coming through the paper started to become important.  I put him in sunglasses because I wanted to have the reflection of the paper and at the same time, NOT see his eyes.  Kind of an anonymous look. It also helped to bring the paper just high enough so you couldn’t recognize him. The paper became a big reflector to pump light back into his face so that he wouldn’t be in complete darkness.  Dramatic, playful, successful.  Keep looking!!

More later…

ML

Chairs by the seaside…

Photo by Michael LoBiondo

Chairs by the seaside..

I have this fascination with taking photographs where ordinary things we see everyday from angles or perspectives that you don’t ordinarily see.  These chairs are standing (sitting?) at attention like they are waiting for something to emerge from the ocean or the far horizon.  What are they thinking, what do they see?  Are they just at rest while waiting for the next person to sit on them or have they already done their job and enjoying the gaze of the sunset  and the peace of the ocean.  Do they hear the rustle of the breeze or the crashing of the waves?  Maybe they are just chairs in the grass!

More later…

ML

Curlys Flags in Ocean City New Jersey

Photo by Michael LoBiondo

Curlys Flags wait for customers

It’s been a long time since my last post but here is an image from one of my favorite places in the world, Ocean City NJ.  Actually, I love most beaches, boardwalks, and grand strands.  I grew up not far from Ocean City and a few weeks ago, I was shooting a job in South Jersey.  Just so you know, only someone from South Jersey distinguishes South Jersey as different from the rest of the state.  Not enough words to explain it, just go with me here.  I had an extra morning so I drove to OC in the morning before they got busy and started to charge you to “use the sand”.

Photo by Michael LoBiondo

nothin’ about nudity!!

There’s still a lot you can do on the beach.  But sand does get everywhere!  I love the beach in the morning.  I have great memories of being in the station wagon with my mom and driving to OC in the morning and being back at home by lunch.  Now I drive a mini-van.  See how far we’ve come!

Being on the beach before the crowds get there allow me to scrounge around and get access to pictures that I might not have when there’s a lot of people around.  Hence, Curlys Flags.  5 minutes after I took this, the attendant came out and scattered the flags everywhere.  I will be posting some other shots on my facebook page.  Please friend me if you haven’t already.

More later…

ML

Luck or Patience…

Photo by Michael LoBiondo

Luck or Patience…

To quote a great golfer, “The more I practice, the luckier I get” (Lee Travino, Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Jerry Barber…who knows).  I use this to illustrate that what looks like luck is sometimes just patience.  It’s like when you “know” you have the shot in the camera.  The ability to wait for the right moment to click the shutter involves anticipation of what’s coming and having patience.

This image was for the Charlotte Convention Center and Visitors Bureau.  We were shooting simultaneously from this angle and 90degrees from this angle across the street.  Here’s the catch: we couldn’t have any people in the shot and there was a convention going on with over 10,000 people at the same time.  We weren’t allowed to approach anyone at the convention to ask them to move or to stop any flow of people leaving or entering the building.  Being a dusk shot, you only have a few minutes with the perfect light.  We had to wait until there wasn’t anyone on the sidewalk because post would have been difficult.  So we waited and watched.  It was like the place had a pulse…hundreds of people could be at the doors in seconds.  There are actually a bunch of people to the left of the frame.

We took MANY exposures and bracketed all along the way.  There was 1 perfect shot.  No people.  Post production for spotting and the usual stuff.

To see more of our architecture images, go HERE. If you have questions about any of our images, drop me a line and we will use it in a future post.

Was it “luck” or “patience”?

More later

ML

While shooting headshots…….

Photo by Michael LoBiondo

Chef Frespech

Sometimes, even headshot assignments provide opportunities to get creative with your subjects.  The most interesting view may not be the person looking into the camera.  What view gives you the best story or gives you an inside look at someones’ personality.

This is Chef Philippe Frespech of The Pines at Davidson, a retirement community in Davidson.  He was gracious to give me a few extra minutes to get this shot of him in profile wearing his chef jacket and togue (hat), freshly cleaned and pressed.  This chef has to produce a menu for his clients who can at times be very particular and is proud of what comes out of his kitchen.

Get out your camera even if it’s your phone camera and get shooting.  Spring is coming fast and the trees are starting to bloom.  Think outside the box to tell a great story.

More later

ML